Contingent bags £1.7M: UK headquartered startup aims to reduce risk and strengthen supply chain – UKTN

Contingent bags £1.7M: UK headquartered startup aims to reduce risk and strengthen supply chain  UKTN
“startups when:1d” – Google News

Agritech startup INI Farms enters D2C commerce after disrupting fruit supply chain and exports – YourStory.com

Agritech startup INI Farms enters D2C commerce after disrupting fruit supply chain and exports  YourStory.com
“startups when:1d” – Google News

This Dutch agritech startup uses satellite data to tackle deforestation & help companies achieve a more sustainable supply chain; raises €1.9M

Dutch agritech startup Satelligence is a satellite-powered geodata analytics company providing daily insights into the global performance of agricultural production and supply chain risks, such as deforestation, forest fires and flooding. The company has secured nearly €1.9M funding to bring about a transformation in the global commodity supply chains and eliminate deforestation.

Investment from 4impact!

Based out of Utrecht, Satelligence has secured $ 2.3M (nearly €1.9M) funding from Dutch tech and impact investor 4impact along with the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 programme. The investment will allow its clients to improve their mitigation of social and environmental risk involved in agricultural commodity production. Satelligence’s investment further strengthens the development and implementation of risk forecasting and carbon accounting methods.

Development plans ahead

Until recently, food and agribusiness players and investors lacked the tools and data necessary to assess and report progress to minimise deforestation, vegetation fires and other forms of ecosystem degradation. This resulted in environmental damage and social conflict. With Satelligence and other such agritech startups, it is possible to minimise these losses and damage.

Founded by Niels Wielaard in 2016, Satelligence leverages insights based on satellite and supply chain asset data, machine learning and human intelligence. The Dutch startup offers more accurate and granular visibility over their supply chains to identify those environmental risks and opportunities and take meaningful action. Its technology monitors land cover changes such as deforestation and fire impact using satellite imagery and artificial intelligence. These can be analysed within the most complete and up-to-date supply chain asset information.

Rapid warnings and science-based information delivered via web app, data feeds or custom reports help identify risky suppliers and reduce the necessity for ground checks. Apparently, it leads to better engagement and responsible sourcing strategies, contracts and investments.

“We achieved very strong growth to date based on market demand. Building on our strong partnerships, we aim to service new commodities and markets and cover more risks beyond deforestation and vegetation fires, enabling clients to be first to know and first to act on risk and performance issues,” says Wielaard, founder and CEO of Satelligence.

It helps customers including Mondelez, Unilever, Bunge, WorldBank, Rabobank, Robeco, World Wildlife Fund, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands demonstrate progress towards zero deforestation, and make the right sourcing and investment decisions. Commodities covered include palm oil, cocoa, soy, rubber, beef, pulp and paper, biomass among others. It has offices in the Netherlands, Bolivia, Indonesia, Ghana, and Tanzania.

According to the company, it hopes to expand to 2 – 3 other market segments which it thinks are serviceable: financial institutions, luxury goods and fashion. New industry-led commodity initiatives appear, for instance for rubber. “We will rapidly expand beyond palm oil, cocoa, and soy in the coming years. Leading coffee and rubber traders have already contacted us,” the company says.

Main image picture credits: Satelligence

Startups – Silicon Canals

Altana raises $7M to protect supply chains from disruptions, child labor

Supply chains used to be one of those magical elements of capitalism that seemed to be designed by Apple: they just worked. Minus the occasional salmonella outbreak in your vegetable aisle, we could go about our daily consumer lives never really questioning how our fast-fashion clothes, tech gadgets, and medical supplies actually got to our shelves or homes.

Of course, a lot has changed over the past few years. Anti-globalization sentiment has grown as a political force, driving governments like the United States and the United Kingdom to renegotiate free trade agreements and attempt to onshore manufacturing while disrupting the trade status quo. Meanwhile, the COVID-19 pandemic placed huge stress on supply chains — with some entirely breaking in the process.

In short, supply chain managers suddenly went from one of those key functions that no one wants to think about, to one of those key functions that everyone thinks about all the time.

While these specialists have access to huge platforms from companies like Oracle and SAP, they need additional intelligence to understand where these supply chains could potentially break. Are there links in the supply chain that might be more brittle than at first glance? Are there factories in the supply chain that are on alert lists for child labor or environmental violations? What if government trade policy shifts — are we at risk of watching products sit in a cargo container at a port?

New York-headquartered Altana wants to be that intelligence layer for supply-chain management, bringing data and machine learning to bear against the complexity of modern capitalism. Today, the company announced that it has raised $ 7 million in seed financing led by Anne Glover of London-based Amadeus Capital Partners.

The three founders of the startup, CEO Evan Smith, CTO Peter Swartz, and COO Raphael Tehranian, all worked together on Panjiva, a global supply chain platform that was founded in 2006, funded by Battery Ventures a decade ago, and sold to S&P Global in early 2018. Panjiva’s goal was to build a “graph” of supply chains that would offer intelligence to managers.

That direct experience informs Altana’s vision, which in many ways is the same as Panjiva’s but perhaps revamped using newer technology and data science. Again, Altana wants to build a supply-chain knowledge graph, provide intelligence to managers, and create better resilience.

The difference has to do with data. “What we continually found when we were in the data sales business was that you are kind of stuck in that place in the value chain,” Smith said. “Your customers won’t let you touch their data, because they don’t trust you with it, and other proprietary data companies don’t let you work on and manage and transform their data.”

Instead of trying to be the central repository for all data, Altana is “operating downstream” from all of these data sources, allowing companies to build their own supply chain graphs using their own data and whatever other data sources they have access to.

The company sells into procurement offices, which are typically managed in the CFO’s office. Today, the majority of customers for Altana are government clients such as border control, where “the task is to pick the needles out of the haystack as the ship arrives and you’ve got to pick the illicit shipments from the safe ones and actually facilitate the lawful trade,” Smith said.

The company’s executive chairman is Alan Bersin, who is a former commissioner of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency currently working as a policy consultant for Covington & Burling, which has been one of the premier law firms on trade issues like CFIUS during the Trump administration.

Altana allows one-off investigations and simulations, but its major product goal is to offer real-time alerts that give supply chain managers substantive visibility into changes that affect their business. For instance, rather than waiting for an annual labor or environmental audit to find issues, Altana hopes to provide predictive capabilities that allow companies to solve problems much faster than before.

In addition to Amadeus, Schematic Ventures, AlleyCorp, and the Working Capital – The Supply Chain Investment Fund also participated.

Startups – TechCrunch

Cloud Computing Market Analysis, COVID-19 Impact,Outlook, Opportunities, Size, Share Forecast and Supply Demand 2021-2027|Trusted Business Insights – Cheshire Media

Cloud Computing Market Analysis, COVID-19 Impact,Outlook, Opportunities, Size, Share Forecast and Supply Demand 2021-2027|Trusted Business Insights  Cheshire Media
“sweden startups when:7d” – Google News

Advanced driver-assistance systems: Luminar to supply lidar sensors for Mobileye’s self-driving fleet – Latest News – Up News Info

Advanced driver-assistance systems: Luminar to supply lidar sensors for Mobileye’s self-driving fleet – Latest News  Up News Info
“startups when:1d” – Google News

Luminar to supply lidar sensors for Intel subsidiary’s self-driving fleet – The Business Times

Luminar to supply lidar sensors for Intel subsidiary’s self-driving fleet  The Business Times
“startups when:1d” – Google News