5 Key Recovery Strategies Counter Economic Downturns

startup-economic-downturnEvery dark cloud has a silver lining. Driven by the current pandemic, smart entrepreneurs of all ages are jumping into the fray with new ideas, new recovery strategies, and discarding outmoded business models. I see it most in the newest generation of entrepreneurs (Gen-Y), who were shocked out of entitlement into action by an economic downturn.

Donna Fenn, in her book from the last decade, “Upstarts! How GenY Entrepreneurs are Rocking the World of Business,” was one of the first to predict that Gen-Y would lead the charge, bounce back from the recession at that time, and be big winners. She describes a new generation of entrepreneurs that is highly collaborative, quick and alert when it comes to new technologies, and hell-bent on changing the world in general.

Upstarts! examines and analyses this entrepreneurial revolution to reveal critical lessons every Gen-Y entrepreneur and marketer must learn. But the insights I see from her book and elsewhere are equally applicable to startup founders of all ages, and businesses of all ages. Here are five key recovery strategies that both of us recommend to all of you:

  1. Pursue repeat business. It’s far less expensive to nail down repeat business from your existing customers than it is to land new ones. Now is the time to reap the benefits of those good customer relationships that you’ve been cultivating. Viral marketing campaigns to lure new customers will cost you big money.
  1. Focus on your core competency. Examine every cost center in your business. Maybe it’s time to outsource that call center operation, or complex manufacturing setup. Look for operations that are hogging resources without generating significant revenue. With a concentrated point of focus, your company might be well positioned for growth this year.
  1. Snap up top talent. Past layoffs at big companies usually means more great employees on the market now for newer companies. Examine your pool of higher-paid contractors and freelancers. Now is the time to bring on board those people who would have been inaccessible in a better economy.
  1. Respond rapidly to market shifts. The pandemic has almost certainly had a profound impact on your customers: they may have altered their purchasing habits, or found themselves with entirely different needs. It’s your opportunity to respond to those shifts. These are chances to broaden your product line, change distribution, offer new services.
  1. Look for hidden sources of revenue. Sometimes your best source of new revenue is right under your nose, like services revenue in support of your products. One entrepreneur in Fenn’s book had a proprietary technology to efficiently manage vendors which works so well that she is now marketing it to other companies for a transaction fee.

Most companies I know agree that the pandemic has taught them the art of laser-like focus, and compelled them to make better decisions, to become more frugal, and to initiate systems and procedures that will help position them make an economic recovery. Simply deciding to lay low and “tough it out” was never a winning strategy.

I agree with Fenn that a recession or pandemic is actually a good “wake-up call” for many in the new generation – it has forced them to face the reality of hard knocks. Similarly, it should be a wake-up call for the rest of us, or we will be overrun by young entrepreneurs with their burning desire to control their own destinies.

But I’m convinced that you don’t need to be an “Upstart!” to capitalize on hard times. Use your experience and your expertise to lead the way, or you will be left in the dust. The first step is to execute your own recovery strategy. Or don’t you even have one?

Marty Zwilling
Startup Professionals Musings

Proven Strategies For Building a Successful Surgical Robotics Startup – RoboBusiness Direct Session October 22nd – Robotics Business Review

Proven Strategies For Building a Successful Surgical Robotics Startup – RoboBusiness Direct Session October 22nd  Robotics Business Review
“startups when:1d” – Google News

5 survival strategies for fintech start-ups during covid-19 pandemic – Business MattersBusiness Matters

5 survival strategies for fintech start-ups during covid-19 pandemic  Business MattersBusiness Matters
“startups when:1d” – Google News

2 strategies for creating top-of-funnel marketing content

Even when you’re excellent at making the sale, you still need people to know you exist in the first place.

Content is excellent at making the case for your product or service, but it also excels at providing value to potential customers in a more tangential way, introducing them to your brand and building awareness and authority.

Here’s how utilizing content marketing and digital PR can make huge strides in getting your brand name out there.

Ranking on-site content for awareness keywords

When on-site content you created ranks well in the search engine results pages (SERPs), that doesn’t just mean you get more traffic (although that’s certainly a major benefit).

You’re also getting your brand name in front of searchers because you’re appearing in the results. You’re building authority because Google appears to believe you have the best answer for their query. You’re giving the searcher and answer to their question and beginning to build trust.

So how do you know which keywords/topics to target and what kind of content to create? You perform keyword research, which basically means examining what keywords people are searching for, how many people search for them per month and how hard it’ll be to rank for them.

Google Ads Keyword Planner provides this information, but you can also use Chrome plugins like Keywords Everywhere and Keyword Surfer or free tools like Ubersuggest.

When your goal is to build awareness, it’s important that the keywords and topics you target have high volume. In other words, they’re searched a lot. Awareness objectives mean reaching as many people as possible so more people know that your brand exists and begin to understand what it’s about.

Startups – TechCrunch

8 Strategies To Improve Your Odds Of Getting A Loan

debt-loan-approvedA common question I get is “How do I get a bank loan to fund my startup?” The default answer is that it probably won’t happen, because most banks just don’t make bank loans to startups. The failure rate is just too high, and startups typically don’t have the assets or revenue stream to back up the loan. That’s why angel and equity investors are so sought after by entrepreneurs.

In my experience, some startup founders do overcome these odds, but you need to be realistic and do your homework. Here are some tips and rules of thumb to improve your odds and help you understand when a bank loan or line of credit is possible, and how to get it:

  1. Write a good business plan first. Approaching a banker without a business plan, and asking for money, is a sure way to be rejected and leave a bad first impression. Pay particular attention to the financials, and have a CPA friend review for reasonableness before presenting.

  1. Clean up your credit rating before you apply. Good credit ratings, both personal and business, are essential to getting a loan or line of credit. This is just common sense, since every loan has a repayment schedule, and your credit score reflects your track record of paying bills on time.
  1. Pick a business domain that is squeaky clean. Certain business sectors have historical high failure rates and are routinely avoided by banks and investors. These include food service, retail, consulting, work at home, and telemarketing. Also, don’t expect enthusiasm for your gambling site, porn site, gaming, or debt collection business.
  1. Show a significant personal investment. Most loan programs, and most investors, want to see that you have “skin in the game’ before helping you. If you have nothing at risk, your own level of commitment is suspect. As a general rule, your investment should be at least 20 percent of the total projected loan requirement.
  1. Demonstrate an ability to repay from revenues, not collateral. Bankers will insist that you have collateral to back the loan, like equipment, or even your home. They actually prefer to see that you have a revenue stream to repay the loan, since they don’t want to own another home. The more conservative ask for two years of positive cash flow.
  1. Demonstrate experience in starting a business, ideally in this domain. Bankers, like investors, fund people rather than ideas. Your idea alone will not get you a loan, but your experience running businesses may get you a loan, even if not intimately related to the current proposal.
  1. Conduct meetings at your site, not at the bank. You have an advantage if you can get them on your turf, and even get several key employees to tag-team the presentation. If you are a startup operating out of your garage or basement, you are likely too early in the cycle to get banks interested.
  1. Eliminate your salary from the use of funds. Most startup founders don’t take a salary for the first year or two, since most investors as well as bankers won’t give you money so that you can pay yourself. The most positive use of funds is to buy raw materials to build product for existing customer orders. In fact, customer orders are great collateral.

Even if you can’t meet all these criteria, it’s definitely worthwhile to utilize the free services of the Small Business Administration (SBA) and SCORE in the US to get their help in preparing for the loan option. They have contacts with the more “startup friendly” banks in your area, like Silicon Valley Bank, and might even be able to arrange a “loan guarantee” if you meet these criteria.

In all cases, the loan option should be investigated before looking for an angel investor, since the “cost” of a loan is usually considered less than giving up a large share of your company equity and control to angel or venture capital investors. I’m told that 21 companies on the Inc 500 list started with bank loans, so you can do it too.

Marty Zwilling
Startup Professionals Musings