Will Camera Startup Light Give Autonomous Vehicles Better Vision than Lidar? – IEEE Spectrum

Will Camera Startup Light Give Autonomous Vehicles Better Vision than Lidar?  IEEE Spectrum
“startups when:1d” – Google News

I was meant to give a 60 minute presentation for an interview for a head of growth role at a startup, then Covid happened so I never got to give it. So I’m going to do 6 little blogs on the slides I would have presented and publish them here as not to waste the time I put in. This is 1/6 – Intro.

This was a 60 minute presentation that I was going to have to give as a final round for a head of growth role before Covid happened and I never got to give it, I really don't want it to go to waste.

It comprises a few key parts, and despite the slight romanticising of a ‘growth hacker’ role over the last couple of years, it’s anything but a telenovela. These were the slides.

  1. Intro
  2. Data friendliness
  3. Manufacturing creativity
  4. Diversifying growth
  5. Mission evangelism
  6. Rate limiting steps

I am a growth hacker, but I think it may have also changed slightly since Sean Ellis made the differentiation in 2010 between marketer and growth hacker: Sean coined the term when he couldn’t find anyone to replace the work he was doing as a marketing consultant at this time, issuing the need for a new job specification altogether.

This would have been my introduction, simply highlighting a few key areas that would make for a fantastic environment for a growth lead to come in.

Firstly, growth is still true north

If retention suffers, if the brand is dragged through the mud, if the campaigns starts to open a wormhole into a universe with giant eye-eating monsters; that simply isn’t the growth hacker’s problem. As a blinkered horse charges, as a berserker cleaves heads; one is not to reason why, one is but to grow or die.

In the most simple of terms, any job that does not involve THE number going up, is not the responsibility of the growth team.

Secondly, have a North Star Metric

This is THE thing you can base your company’s success on. Defining this will help a growth manager remain streamlined in their work. It will also encourage absolute transparency and efficiency with work. ‘How does the work you are currently undertaking help us achieve our goal?’

If you haven’t worked it out yet, do it now.

Thirdly, understand the simple sum behind growth.

UX + Product + Marketing = Customer Advocacy.

Advocacy + Growth Marketing = Successful growth

This is simple. If the product does not have a gradual upwards trend organically, then do not expect a growth marketer to come in and fix this. Growth hacking is a way of making as many eyes and ears as possible see the product for what it is, it is not tilting what the product is in order for it to be more appealing to the audience.

I have had to do the latter, it ends poorly.

Finally, good ideas are systematised.

Sitting around waiting for awesome things to happen is like waiting for lightning to strike on a summer’s day. As a company, create processes that drive creativity and free thinking.

———————————————————————————

I will publish the first blog tomorrow regarding data friendliness. I couldn’t think of a better way to explain it. It essentially means becoming incredibly knowledgeable about the processes and percentages that lead to a conversion, across the whole marketing effort.

Feel free to ask me questions along the way, it's going to be a cathartic journey.

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

CRISPR Startups Give Genome Editing Several New Twists – Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News

CRISPR Startups Give Genome Editing Several New Twists  Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
“startups when:1d” – Google News

What advice would you give someone who is considering working at a start up? What questions should a potential employee ask before signing on?

I am not sure if this is the correct place to ask these questions, but I have been working at a large corporation for most of my career. I was recently introduced to a person who is running a startup, and we set up a time next week to discuss an opportunity there. What questions would you want answers to if you were considering such a dramatic career change?

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

Note to self — Never give up on your dreams

About 6 months ago I started working on a small project. It was a side project. I had this problem that had been bothering me for a while, I talked to friends and colleagues about it. I didn’t have much time to work on it though. I was in the final stretch of my degree and my capstone.

Nonetheless, I got to work. Every bit of free time I had — in the mornings before class, on weekend and late nights — I dedicated myself to building my mini little side project.

About a month later I had a working app. When I say working, I mean it didn’t crash, and it was so far from what I had in mind it was embarrassing. Screw it though, I published it. Nothing happened. I continued working on it in my free time and started building the features that I wanted. To help myself. This tool was truly something that I wanted and in fact had convinced myself I needed.

Apparently, others were interested too. From a simple gif that I posted online, a few people left their email, and wanted to try it out. Initial feedback from these users, my friends, and my roommate was almost null. They thought it was pretty, and some even said it saved them a couple times, but no real praise was given. More concerningly, no criticisms. I think my roommate was just being nice, and the other users simply stopped using the app.

What did I do? I did what I knew I could. I reached out, I asked for feedback, suggestions, and comments. I continued working in the background, constantly iterating. Low and behold, after some time, I got some feedback. Some good, some bad. I thanked everyone who responded and told them to keep sending any feedback. I fixed things, I changed things, I iterated.

As more and more people tried out the app, I kept on reaching out manually and continued the cycle.

Now 4 months in, I had gone full time on this “Side project”. I committed myself to seeing through my vision. I did however, take note daily of the looming stress of not having any real income, and dedicating 95% of my time to something that I simply just wanted to work on, not that had any promise or guarantee of success. I was, you could say, building a small startup.

Things intensified, I decided I needed to make this thing real. I needed to focus on the early adopters who were willing to pay for an unproven tool — the ones who provided real feedback, were invested in the tool, and actually wanted it to succeed.

Unfortunately, the situation just got tougher — users had lots of praise but also equal amounts of confusion. I continued pushing forward, continued iterating, stretching my days to as long as possible; essentially working for as long and hard as I could, fueled only by small plaudits from users. I was making a sacrifice familiar to so many founders, managers, hackers, nomads, and the like. Your friends, family, and other life aspects suffer while you work. While you commit yourself so wholeheartedly to a dream. It sounds aspirational, but it is in fact a very daunting, unrelenting, daily struggle.

Finally, someone very close to me snapped. They said, “I’m tired of seeing you do this, working away at nothing”. This wasn’t new. Doubt and disapproving judgements were constant. I reassured and tried to communicate my vision. No luck.

This weighed heavily on me. Really I only faced two options. Give up, and get on with a normal life. Or continue working on my dream, at the sacrifice of myself, friends, and family.

I chose myself.

Not 30 minutes later, and the reason for writing this piece, I received an email. I will never forget this moment. I received a notification that one of my users became a paying subscriber. A small light in a dark, lonely cave. I felt a rush of emotion.

I am writing this to tell myself, and maybe even you the reader, do not give up. Do not lose hope. Stay ever optimistic, foolish, and persistent. Evaluate yourself and your dreams daily and improve. Do not give up simply because they aren’t working out just yet. People on the internet, your own doubts and family will tell you to give up. To “stop wasting your time”. Your dreams are your dreams, own them. I will end this with a quote that has stuck with me:

"I can't imagine a person becoming a success who doesn't give this game of life everything he's got." – Walter Cronkite

PS if you’re feeling down, need some motivation/advice/ or just someone to talk to feel free to reach out. I’d be more than happy to chat.

If you want to checkout the tool I’ve been working so hard on you can see it here: https://www.partizion.io/

Stay hungry, stay foolish,

Matthew

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

For pre-development/pre-users/pre-revenue startups, do investors even give a damn that you have forecasted unit economics?

Say, you're trying to get funded on your idea, the plan, the team, the blueprint — in pitching to investors at that stage, are the unit economics such as LTV:CAC important at all?

Because it's (largely) conjecture at that point, I'm wondering if it's something that really matters or not in the eyes of an investor.

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!