Hear Cloudflare and PlanGrid’s amazing journey from founding to exit at Disrupt 2020

How and when should startup founders think about the “exit”? It’s the perennial question in tech entrepreneurialism, but the hows and whens are questions to which there are a multitude of answers. For one thing, new founders often forget that the terms of the exit may not eventually be entirely in their control. There’s the board to think of, the strategic direction of the company, the first-in investors, the last-in. You name it. We’ll be chatting about this at Disrupt 2020.

Exits normally happen in only one of two ways: Either the startup gets acquired for enough money to give the investors a return or it grows big enough to list on the public markets. And it just so happens we have two perfect founders who will be able to unpack their own journeys on those two roads.

When Cloudflare went public last year it certainly wasn’t the end of its 10-year journey, and nor was it PlanGrid’s when it was acquired by Autodesk in 2018.

Cloudflare’s Michelle Zatlyn saw every nook and cranny of the company’s journey toward its IPO, which received a warm reception, even if there were a few bumps along the road leading up to it. What comes after an IPO and how do you even get there in the first place? Zatlyn will be laying it all out for us.

PlanGrid’s journey to acquisition by Autodesk was equally fascinating, and Tracy Young — who, as CEO and co-founder, shepherded the company to an $ 875 million exit — will be able to give us insight into what it’s like to dance with a potential acquirer, go through that (often fraught) process and come out the other side.

We’re excited to host this conversation at Disrupt 2020 and expect it to fill up quickly. Grab your pass before this Friday to save up to $ 300 on this session and more.

Startups – TechCrunch

Will founding a startup hurt or help future job opportunities?

I'm a software engineer with about 1 year of experience, and I have a startup I am considering founding with someone else. Right now I work for a small company, and work on the startup as a side project. If the startup gets enough traction I plan on working on it full time, because I think it has a lot of potential and I care about the idea a lot. If it falls, I figure that it will be a great learning experience any way. Would founding a start up be a positive or a negative on my resume if I do have to go back to a "normal" job?

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

Yunqi founding partner Michael Mao calls on fintech start-ups to safeguard boundaries and create long-term value as three of its angel-round invested companies are included in CB Insights List – PRNewswire

Yunqi founding partner Michael Mao calls on fintech start-ups to safeguard boundaries and create long-term value as three of its angel-round invested companies are included in CB Insights List  PRNewswire
“startups when:1d” – Google News

Part of founding team – looking for advice

I am part of a small team working in startup (part time). The founder is my coworker/friend. He has a good idea but isn’t really experienced or hands on like me. I have plenty of years of experience in software engineering and doing bulk of the software work. He and another are working on the AI aspect of the project.

My questions/concerns:

  1. I am more of a “let’s get shit done” and blunt about things. He’s more sensitive and kind of like a kid. I am not sure how to best get the team to be productive without overstepping the lines.

  2. I also want to do an honest job and help everyone and be fair but I am worried the way i do things might be too “rough”.

  3. Equity – what is a fair share I should receive? I understand he’s the founder and should hold majority/controlling shares. Is 15-20% too much? There are 4-5 people on the team and I know I will be doing a lot of the work. Especially making big decisions because a lot of the team is passive. Also is an email from him stating my equity stake enough as proof of my stake? If something down the line was to happen. If I left or they decided they needed to dilute or cut my share.

Finally, I know I would do a better job for the company if I was leading the group but I want to respect the fact it’s my friends idea and let him lead. But I have my concerns of him leading it.

Input is greatly appreciated.

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

What should the company founding date be?

I own a company where we started working on a new product/business back in 2017. We got some early traction, but found that we were going to need to invest significantly more resources into the product to get it done…. so we temporarily shelved it.

Fast forward to 2020, and we’re weeks away from launch and are ready to make some noise on social media, put it on our LinkedIn accounts etc.

What we’re not sure of is when to say the product/new company was founded. Technically it was in beta in 2017.

Do we say the company was founded in 2017? Or do we say the company began when we launch in a few weeks?

Would greatly love feedback!!

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

What does the ‘Ideal’ founding team look like?

Hey y'all,

After several years of trial and tribulation I have finally started to get my startup project to a stage where there seems to be a compelling enough reason to join. (Yay)I've still not raised but have taken a few payments and gained a lot of interest over recent months.

I have recently partnered up with a technical co-founder, which I'm aware is absolutely essential for the progress of the project and I am content with.

However, in the process of advertising potential co-founder roles in the company everywhere from London to Kathmandu I have received responses from people with very interesting profiles.A lot of these individuals are competent, but I'm not sure are essential, and in some cases may even be detrimental to the progress me and my new tech buddy can make.

Putting aside the obvious things such as vision alignment, chemistry between co-founders etc;

What do you feel are the most important skill sets for the founding team to possess? Should I even take on a third person, if me and the current co-founder can get to the next stage without a third?How do you divvy up equity between a third co-founder that might be useful, but certainly isn't adding as much value as the original founder or the person building the product.

As always, thanks for your time!
M

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!