Create a handbook and integrate AI to onboard remote employees

The pandemic has forced organizations across the globe to shutter the office environment, and take up a remote-first strategy. Through necessity, professionals have adapted to remote working. But the systems they use are still playing catch up.

One area less readily accommodating to the remote environment is the onboarding process. Given that it is the first sustained contact that a new starter has with a company,  a remote-first strategy is dependent on its success. When looking to onboard new employees, the luxuries of first-day meet and greets, in-person hardware setup, and a team lunch are no longer available. From interview to offer-letter and beyond, any new hire’s early journey is critical to their life at the company, their job satisfaction and ultimately their productivity. The remote induction must be a smooth process, and so needs a thorough rethink.

A cultural shift in the company may be necessary. Organizations need to embrace knowledge-sharing and collaboration, by turning to a “handbook first” approach. A few simple steps can lead them there. Companies also need to analyze their workflow. Are the right systems in place to ensure the seamless flow of both tacit and explicit knowledge?

Perhaps most importantly, artificial intelligence can help transform a clunky old onboarding process into a sophisticated, smooth journey. Naturally the best AI models to use will depend on the business, and department in question. However, with a few pointers business leaders can carve out a path to AI integration.

Let’s dive into the specifics that can transform the remote onboarding process, for the benefit of both the company and the new starter in question.

How to handbook

This is arguably the most important piece of the puzzle when it comes to ensuring newcomers are able to access the right information at the right time; it’s also the most difficult to get right. It is for workers at all levels of an organization to think about how knowledge is shared between teams, and the processes which surround that interchange of ideas.

What is most important is that everyone in an organization prioritizes documentation; exactly how they do it is secondary. You can spin up plenty of free and paid softwares to start creating a handbook. Anything cloud based is suitable, with more sophisticated paid options recommended to keep things easily searchable with documentation sorted into well defined hierarchies, rather than losing those nuggets of information in a sea of folders.

However, this systemic challenge is best addressed from top down. The process should include some checks and balances, with permissioning crucial for parts of the handbook which should remain static, like policies and SLPs. Other parts of the documentation should be kept flexible, like processes and team level knowledge. The majority of the handbook must be democratized as far as possible.

Gitlab, an all-remote company, first coined the term “handbook-first.” The DevOps software provider acts as a great example of a company that lives and breathes through documenting and codifying internal knowledge. Everyone within the organization buys into the mantra of documenting what they know, with subject matter experts assigned to manage knowledge base content. Keeping company documentation up to date is a collaborative task, considered paramount to the company’s livelihood. Softwares give a helping hand, nudging contributors to keep information up to date.

Darren Murph, Head of Remote at GitLab, says that their documentation strategy, twinned with a cooperative approach, helps to build trust with new starters. “When everything a new hire needs to know is written down, there’s no ambiguity or wondering if something is missing. We couple documentation with an Onboarding Buddy – a partner who is responsible for directing key stakeholder conversations and ensuring that acclimation goes well.”

Startups – TechCrunch

Ex-Twitch Employees Raise $3.5 Million For Beauty-Focused Streaming Startup ‘Newness’ – Tubefilter

Ex-Twitch Employees Raise $ 3.5 Million For Beauty-Focused Streaming Startup ‘Newness’  Tubefilter
“startups when:1d” – Google News

How do you best calculate costs needed to start the company? And what kind of payment structure should I follow for employees if I can’t afford to pay people hourly and such?

I'm starting a indie game development company. Sometimes I see projects on Kickstarter being funded with just like 40k dollars. Between four people that's not even 10k a year.

I'm trying to avoid revenue share. I know about contractual kind of funding based on tasks completed but are there any resources to this or better methods for calculating and divvying funding to employees?

Thanks in advance!

submitted by /u/FaolanBaelfire
[link] [comments]
Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

Immigration startup Boundless consolidates customer service team; 31 employees affected – GeekWire

Immigration startup Boundless consolidates customer service team; 31 employees affected  GeekWire
“startups when:1d” – Google News

3 Things Testing for Emotional Intelligence Can Reveal About Your Law Firm’s Employees

The following is adapted from “Fireproof” by Mike Morse

Have you ever wondered why some lawyers excel at attracting and keeping clients? How some have a knack for communicating or consistently make ethical decisions?

The answer is that they have high emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is a person’s ability to control, express and interpret emotions. And if you know which of your employees rank well, you can make sure that your best communicators are assigned to people-facing roles.

If you’re wondering how to measure emotional intelligence, there’s good news—you can test for it and make it a regular part of your hiring process. By assessing your employees’ emotional intelligence, you can learn who your best communicators are, who’s most skilled at assessing risks and making ethical choices, and who will help your firm grow and succeed.


StartupNation exclusive discounts and savings on Dell products and accessories: Learn more here

Let’s dig into each of these three insights to see how learning about the emotional intelligence of your employees can help you manage your team.

Reveal your best communicators

Your firm’s best communicators are likely to be the people who score the highest in emotional intelligence. They’re sensitive to others’ emotions, and this makes them great friends and colleagues.

Finding these people among your employees or potential hires is especially valuable because according to Ronda Muir, author of “Beyond Smart: Layering with Emotional Intelligence,” lawyers often score below average in emotional intelligence.

In other words, lawyers who excel at reading emotions and communicating are rare. By identifying and hiring candidates with high emotional intelligence, you can gain an advantage over competing firms that lack skilled communicators.

You’ll want to put these employees in roles that directly interact with clients, handle conflict resolution or attract new business.



Evaluate risk assessment and ethical decision-making skills

Assessing for emotional intelligence can also tell you which of your employees are most skilled at risk assessment and making ethical decisions. Who has a natural instinct for avoiding conflicts and judging wrong from right?

According to Muir, “Emotional intelligence skills sharpen our abilities to assess risks, understand which ethical standards are appropriate in a situation, recognize when and how others are making ethical decisions and to deal better with the emotional fallout from our ethical choices, especially when ignoring or acting against personal values, which lawyers may need to do in advocating for clients.”

It’s no coincidence that emotionally intelligent lawyers incur fewer liability costs. That’s because they communicate better, thus sidestepping miscommunications, the number one reason why attorneys are disciplined or sued for malpractice.

Find drivers of your firm’s growth and success

Finally, your law firm stands to benefit from identifying emotionally intelligent employees because those individuals are the ones most likely to win cases and help grow your business.

Studies have shown that attorneys with high emotional intelligence are more successful than those with lower scores. They are better at attracting and keeping clients, for instance, and firms that actively emphasized emotional intelligence training for their lawyers experienced record-setting revenue.

These employees are the ones you’ll want to promote to leadership positions, assign to lead the most lucrative and challenging cases, and act as the public-facing representatives of your firm.


Sign Up: Receive the StartupNation newsletter!

Work to improve emotional intelligence

Let’s say you test all your firm’s employees for emotional intelligence and find them lacking—don’t panic. Emotional intelligence is a skill that can be learned and practiced like any other.

Muir describes many lawyers as being “militantly rational” instead of emotionally aware, but she says they can improve simply by regularly recording how they feel and why they feel that way. She even recommends they watch movies on mute so they are forced to read characters’ emotional cues.

Even if you don’t recruit emotionally intelligent employees right away, you can build them from inside your business.

Prioritize emotional intelligence

As you can see, there is no secret sauce that makes people master communicators. Their advantage is having high emotional intelligence, which is just as crucial in our business as intellect.

By taking steps to identify, hire and train emotionally intelligent employees, you’ll be able to better apply the strengths of your most talented communicators, more accurately assess risks for the firm and empower your strong communicators to drive your firm’s success.

“Fireproof” is now available for purchase and can be purchased via StartupNation.com.

The post 3 Things Testing for Emotional Intelligence Can Reveal About Your Law Firm’s Employees appeared first on StartupNation.

StartupNation

[DailyPay in PR Newswire] Top American Companies Demonstrate Commitment To Their Employees’ Financial Wellness By Partnering With DailyPay To Support “America Saves Week”

Leading American companies are prioritizing their employees’ financial wellness by teaming up with DailyPay to support employee savings and “America Saves Week.” The annual event that kicks off today is organized by the nonprofit America Saves, an initiative of the Consumer Federation of America. The event’s mission is to encourage and support Americans to save effectively, aimed at motivating individuals and families to take better control of their finances and achieve financial stability.

Read more here.

The post [DailyPay in PR Newswire] Top American Companies Demonstrate Commitment To Their Employees’ Financial Wellness By Partnering With DailyPay To Support “America Saves Week” appeared first on OurCrowd Blog.

OurCrowd Blog